HISTORICAL MINIATURES BY GEORGE GRASSE
CLASSIC AIRCRAFT BETWEEN THE WARS

MARTIN B-10B BOMBER, 23rd Bombardment Squadron, 5th Bombardment Group, Hickham Field c. 1938

by George Grasse

LONE STAR 1:48 SCALE RESIN MOLDED KIT OF THE MARTIN B-10B BOMBER

MARTIN B-10B OF THE 23rd BOMB SQUADRON
This image was taken from the internet and represents the model to be built.

MARTIN B-10B THREE-VIEW
This image was taken from the internet.

 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #1
CLEANING: The Lone Star kit is well molded with no casting or warping problems.  There is a lot of resin casting lugs to remove.  I used my 4" x 36" belt sander to carefully remove the excess material.  This photo shows all of the resin parts.  Note that there are three "cockpit" areas that have a lot of detail parts: bombardier, pilot, rear gunner/radio operator.

 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #2
TAIL UNIT HOOK-UP: The Martin B-10B's fuselage comes in two cast resin parts.  Eighty-five percent of it is the front with fifteen percent making up the tail section.  This is a tricky step and you have to be extremely careful when sanding away the casting lugs on the ends of the fuselage and tail section.  DO NOT REMOVE ANY OF THE ADJOINING FUSELAGE SECTIONS.  Even the slightest over-reach will make it difficult to marry up the two sections.  I used a 4" x 36" belt sander and slightly went a bit too far.   The flat-sided fuselage is easy enough to clean up but the top and bottom ribbing have to be exactly aligned and this can be a serious problem if too much has been removed.

 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #3
WING HALVES GLUED OR JUST HOW BIG IS THIS 1:48 SCALE MODEL?  The Martin B-10B is a large model in 1:48 scale.  Compare it to a 1:48 scale Blue Max Nieuport 28.  The left and right wings of the Martin B-10B each come in an upper and lower half.  I remember Mike at Lone Star telling me that he had some difficulty making sure the wings were cast perfectly to accommodate upper and lower fit.  I had to tack sections one at a time with super glue to eventually get the two halves bonded.  I used several heavy duty rubber bands on the final join.  Not visible are the seams which have had one pass at putty application and sanding.  A second application is necessary.  The wings are just so large I couldn't accomplish filling the voids in one pass. 

 

 

--------------------------------------------   TO BE CONTINUED  -------------------------------------------
 

REFERENCES:

Bell, Dana.  Air Force Colors Volume 1 1926-1942.  Carrollton, Texas: Squadron Signal Publications, 1995.

Breihan, John R., Stan Piet, and Roger S. Mason.  Martin Aircraft 1909-1960.  Santa Ana, California: Narkiewicz/Thompson, 1995.

 

GO TO?

BACK TO CLASSIC AVIATION INDEX

BACK TO AVIATION MAIN INDEX

HISTORICAL MINIATURES JOURNAL

NAVIGATE TO OTHER PAGES
HISTORICAL MINIATURES MILITARY MINIATURES
COPYRIGHT TOP OF PAGE